Bereavement

When you lose someone, or something close to you the sadness you feel is often termed bereavement or grief. You may experience grief as a mental, physical, social or emotional reaction. Mental reactions can include anger, guilt, anxiety, sadness and despair.

Bereavement Counselling

Coming to terms with bereavement and grief can be more difficult for some than others. This can lead to long-term difficulties if these emotions are not processed fully and we may feel we will never recover from our loss.

Bereavement is awful and painful but it is also a natural reaction – there is nothing wrong with you. Grief is a normal, healthy response to loss. Loss does not always mean death of a loved one, but can be the loss of a job or moving from a home where there have been strong emotional memories.

There are different stages of bereavement. The first is usually one of shock or disbelief. Depending on the circumstances of the loss denial may follow and anger or guilt. These emotions can play out in different ways – blaming others or unpredictable emotional behaviour. Depression, with symptoms such as loss of motivation, social withdrawal, and insomnia may follow.   While your bereavement is unique to you, in time you realise that life goes on and being able to talk about your loss with positive feelings suggests that your mind is allowing you to see a way forward.

A helpful way to coming to terms with loss is counselling. The goals of grief counselling include helping the bereaved to identify and express feelings related to their loss. Also to help you understand the methods of coping with often confusing and painful emotions throughout this difficult time.